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20130318
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and that always seemed to me to the clue that is the most interesting. i know the fbi has spent a lot of time trying to figure that out, visiting, talking to associations who are involved with napoleonic memoribilia, to see was there a bounty for one of these? >> reporter: why did the thieves want that flag so badly? is it possible they were given a specific list of artwork to steal by a collector who especially loved those 13 works of art? that brings us to another theory, one that has been made popular by hollywood. >> $1 million, mr. bond. >> reporter: do you think it's possible they're in some private gallery owned by some eccentric billionaire somewhere like the dr. no-type character? >> no. the whole idea that a collector's holding on to stolen magnificent works of art all came from that movie "dr. no." it was a 007 movie, james bond movie from 1962 where james bond is going through dr. no's lair and he sees a painting hanging on the wall. the painting had been stolen the year before. that actually did happen. in 20 years the fbi and five years since then doing these investigations, i h
. the fbi now says it believes it knows who's behind the heist. when it happened, suspicion quickly fell on the museum's security guards. for the first time, one of those guards is sharing his story on camera in an exclusive interview with randi kaye. >> reporter: there was no trace of the thieves. authorities got an idea of what the bad guys looked like from the two night watchmen. the only ones to see the thieves up close. but it all happened so fast. they were tied up and blindfolded within minutes. watchman rick abbott gave this description to his sketch artist. >> the guy who was dealing with me was kind of taller and skinny and wearing gold-framed like round glasses, if i remember correctly. he had a mustache. i remember before he arrested me that it looked really greasy, i remember thinking that. he was using some funky kind of wax on that thing or something like that. it was probably a fake mustache. >> reporter: but the description from rick and the other guard didn't satisfy the fbi. even rick admits the sketch they produced didn't really look like either of the two men. >> i r
from the museum where the art was taken. we'll tell you what the fbi now knows and take you inside the daring crime. >>> we begin, though, with that manhunt now a massive search for a brazen killer who walked up to the doorstep of colorado's prison chief, rang the bell and shot tom clemens dead. cas cas casey buy ant joins us. what's the latest, casey? >> reporter: the latest is, anderson, authorities are asking for help from the public. because they don't have a good sense of who this shooter might have been. the latest bit of information they are pursuing is they're looking for a woman who they describe as a speed walker, who was walking through this neighborhood, she's described as a woman between the ages of 35 and 50 years old, wearing a cap, a jacket, and pants, light-colored pants, exercising through the neighborhood. they say she is not a suspect, but they believe she may have information that could help them potentially identify -- help to identify who the killer might be. they are also looking for a vehicle, a late '80s, early '90s model vehicle described as boxy in natur
after one of the biggest art heists in u.s. history, the fbi announces they know who did it. details ahead. i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just making her comfortable. one night britta told me about a tradition in denmark, "when a person dies," she said, "someone must open the window so the soul can depart." i smiled and squeezed her hand. "not tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> in crime and punishment
, the fbi announces they know who did it. details ahead. ♪ ♪ twith blackberry hub10 and flick typing. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.com/z10. has an equally thrilling, lesser-known counterpart. conquer them with the exhilarating is 250. get great values on your favorite lexus models during the command performance sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> in crime and punishment, the jodi arias murder trial and the mystery surrounding her memory. arias admits killing her boyfriend as you know but claims it was self defense. prosecutor's working hard to make the case this was premeditated murder. for arias, having a lousy memory may be her best defense but after changing her story over and over, the question is will the jury believe she really doesn't remember? randi kaye takes a closer look. >> reporter: jodi arias has amnesia. >> do you have any memories of slashing mr. alexander's throat? >> no. >> reporter: at least that's what her defense team would like the jury to believe. >> why did you put the camera in the washer? >> i don't have memory of that. i
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)